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Quinta Nova Pomares Duoro (Tinto) Review

A great alternative when you’re tired of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir but still want a cozy, warm-feeling wine. It reminded me of an earthy Sangiovese.

Wine review by: Jessyca Frederick

Pomares Duoro (Tinto)
Pomares Duoro (Tinto): front of bottle with wine in glass

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About this Wine

Wine: 2020 Pomares Duoro (Tinto)
Blend: 100% Malbec
Region: Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina
I consumed it: September 2022
My source: The Bold Reds Series by International Wine of the Month Club

Where to Buy It

Buy it at: International Wine of the Month Club

Discover More

From this wine club: The Bold Reds Series by International Wine of the Month Club

From this winery: Quinta Nova

Region: Portugal

Wine color/style: Red wine

Grape variety or blend: Red blend

Tasting notes: Smooth tannin, Red fruit, Spice, Bright

Other characteristics: Food friendly

Pomares Duoro (Tinto): What I think

Douro is Portugal’s best known wine region and is more broadly known as Douro + Porto (the origin of Portugal’s most famous wine style, Port). Wines from Douro frequently show up on Top 100 wine lists from publications like Wine Spectator and they typically offer better value (quality to price ratio) than other European red wines.

One way to think of Portuguese wine (and Spanish wine, too) is that it’s Old World wine for people who prefer New World wine. If you don’t understand what I mean by that, here’s a great primer on the concept.

This particular Tinto (red wine in Portuguese) is made of three native Portuguese grapes. The Touriga Franca is the most widely planted grape in Douro and is one of the five grapes legally allowed in Port. This blend is essentially a “traditional” red wine blend for Douro and is a great introduction to red wine from the region.

I found the wine smooth, with subtle fruit and spice. It was a bright and food-friendly wine that while enjoyable was not necessarily unique. A great alternative when you’re tired of Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir but still want a cozy, warm-feeling wine. It reminded me of an earthy Sangiovese.

Notice: I hold no formal wine credentials. I am a wine geek who has consumed 1000+ of bottles from 100+ different wine clubs and 1000s more bottles that didn’t come from those wine clubs. I do not accept payment for wine reviews, and I do not accept payments to influence my opinions. I happily accept free wine (and I buy wine).

Why read my wine reviews: Wine taste is subjective. What I like may not be what you like. I try to leave room for you to form your own opinions, so I don’t provide a score or a rating. I do point out wines that are an incredible value or truly not worth the money. I note flaws, wines that don’t have typicity (because this matters if you are buying wine without having tasted it yourself), when wines are out of balance, and when wines lack appropriate body.

I don’t like wasting money (or anything for that matter). I’m careful about where I spend my money and my mindset as a reviewer is to be careful about where you spend yours. I don’t believe a high price tag equals quality and I know for sure there are wines of very good quality that are also a great value.

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